Customer Facing Story Mapping

A user story map is a method for visually covering a story, to help discussions, share understanding and can even be shared with customers.

When building your story map, you should include all the relevant people, regardless of position, in the team. Due to their different foundations and interests, they will all offer unique and valuable points of view. A User Story Map is used to map out what you, as developers or managers think about when it comes to the user’s experience.

One advanced tactic is to involve the customer with a customer facing Story Map.

Customers have probably seen roadmaps but to truly involve a customer a back-log will always show more detail, yet a Story Map can show your progress with a beautiful planned out snapshot.

Why use a customer facing Story Map?

Story Maps are for shared understanding and can share a clear overview of the whole product or project.

While you may not be able to share your post-it note maps very well, here at FeatureMap you can create a copy of your internal map and create a map for public facing, set it to public and share the link, such as this demo map:

The Moviebuddy Current Version

A tool such as FeatureMap, used to share your product design lends more value to the customer, as it is always online, available to view and offer feedback.

When should I use a customer facing story map?

When sharing story maps with customers, it is important to iterate that a story map is not a roadmap, it is a living, breathing, evolving workflow. One day you may have features and functions set for the next release and the very next day it could be bumped up, down or adjusted.

The value of such a map is measured not only in the transparency of your dev team and work, but the process of your dev team.

In one such instance, we saw a knowledgeable member of the public witness a planned feature who then recommended an alternative method and offered code, for free. Through sharing your Story Map the project was assisted by a passionate user.

Story Mapping evolves and changes. If your customers struggle with the methodology it is probably wise to have two maps, one for devs, and one for the customers. You can set one to private, for your team and shareholders who can work through it and have a public shared customer facing map which encourages feedback, and interaction. We advise experimenting with the entirely public facing single map first.

As such we advise involving a customer as soon as possible.

 

How to make the map public?

When on your FeatureMap, click the top right blue spanner icon:

Then below you’ll have your options pop up.

Here you can click “Make map public”.

Do note you can click this button again “Make map private” to remove your public access link.

Make your map public

 

Once public you’ll be able to share the URL and add this to your emails, webpage or direct as links.

To see an example demo map check here: https://www.featuremap.co/mp/FviDEf/moviebuddy

Due Dates, Estimations, Custom Fields

Creating your user story maps you will notice a few fields with due dates, importance, color, and custom fields which are default set to Estimation and Elapsed time.

Card view with further details about priority, deadlines and custom fields

The custom fields have the option to be aggregator fields and the numerical value will add up with other cards in the column, task, activity.

Here you can see that two cards have point values and cost values which are aggregated at the title card at the top:

 

Aggregation.

 

All these features and functions can help with building trust with your customers as you demonstrate transparency with your activities.

Take customer feedback and deliver extra value by integrating their suggestions, ideas and changes into cards, sprints and allow those customers to see their feedback, in real-time, get integrated into a product promoting customer loyalty.

JIRA Integration

FeatureMap offers JIRA integration.

You can sync your map with JIRA or import a snapshot of JIRA and edit it from that point.

With your User Story Map integrated with JIRA, you can sync your tasks and display a beautiful map of your backlog suited for your customer facing interaction.

You can get started with FeatureMap, and if you need more help or ideas, check out our 5 reasons to use User Story Mapping or a specific idea such as Feature Definition.

 

Story Mapping Can Help Your Team Understand

When working with a large organisation it is not uncommon for everyone to picture the product in different ways.

When you have multiple smaller teams come together to create a product, each team can have different requirements. This can clog up development and in some instances waste time, building the same features in multiple different ways.

A few years ago I was assisting in the development of a now-popular mobile app. The team of designers all had different ideas on the end goal and it wasn’t until we mapped the entire user story that this was realised.

Confused Team Mapping Out Individual Requirements

The managers wanted to see a CRM in the backend that would allow them to see the flow of products and users and to manage the support workers and content creators.

The content creators wanted to have a CRM in the backend that allowed them to edit, create and update articles and products.

The sales team wanted to have a map system that would allow users to find a product based on location.

Shared Understanding with a Shared Vision

When we put all three together we could see an overlap of two different CRM systems and a product completely overlooked by the other teams.

Mapping your story helps you find holes in your thinking.

When we set out and built an entire wall, it was clear that each team had a different idea. Once they were able to list each card across the map, teams merged ideas, worked on the initial idea and framed the entire product.

Once the ideas had been merged, expanded and realised, the team was able to expand their understanding to a shared understanding.

Shared MVP Achieved With Understanding

The team were then able to split up their design into a minimum viable product that successfully achieved the desired outcome.

Sadly, it was realised that months had been wasted on planning features of a project with no compatiblity with the rest of the team.

Fortunately, when creating their product on FeatureMap (even linking with remote team members across the world) they were able to hash out a new plan and deliever well within time.

Mapping your story helps with shared understanding.